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BBC presenter, Michael Buerk, made some remarks in a recent article for Radio Times magazine, about fat people. Saying that obesity should not be classified as a disease, he called on society to “leave couch potatoes alone” because they are “weak, not ill.”

Michael Buerk, penned his “fatophobic” article for Radio Times magazine. Saying that obesity should not be classified as a disease, he called on society to “leave couch potatoes alone” because they are “weak, not ill.”

Michael Buerk said fat people who died would be making a “selfless sacrifice” to alleviate overpopulation and bring down costs for the National Health Service, England’s publicly funded national healthcare system.

“How much would he or she cost if, instead of keeling over with a heart attack at 52, they live to a ripe, dementia-ridden old age, requiring decades of expensive care?” Buerk said.

Buerk shot down the idea that society should “reduce the stigma (of) fatness,” instead directly addressing obese individuals with a blunt message: “You’re fat because you eat too much.”

Fat “Body Positive” slobs, took offense to Buerk’s comments. Some of them could hardly eat, after read Buerk’s “fatophobic” article.

Buerk’s article proved controversial. London journalist, Gillian Fisher, penned an opinion piece for the British tabloid Metro, in which she drew from her own experience as an morbidly obese slob, to trash Buerk for his “thoughtless and misplaced aspersions” of fat pigs.

“This blame mentality, that being fat is automatically a problem and is something you ought to change again reinforces the negative view of fatness,” Fisher wrote. “It fails completely to address how challenging weight loss can be, especially if emotional issues or personal problems underlie your relationship with food, as is the case with me.”